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The 2015 WHBPC is Heading to Timaru

October 1, 2014
timaru

Today, the NAH has announced that they have no plans to host the 2015 World Hardcourt Bike Polo Championship, and that they fully support the event heading down to Timaru, New Zealand. With the EHBPA’s deadline to put in an offer come and gone, this gives full rights to Timaru as host of this prestigious bike polo event.

We hope that Timaru can lock down dates as soon as possible so that we can start doing some research into tickets. We are beyond exciting to head to the Southern Hemisphere for the first time!

See you there!

Tournaments

Let’s Stop Doing Worlds Every Year

September 25, 2014

The thing with the World Hardcourt Bike Polo Championship is, for better or worse, that it’s kind of an exaggeration. An expensive one at that. And the truth is we put a lot of stock into Worlds being perfect and the pinnacle of bike polo development when in fact we don’t even have a really clear vision of what bike polo will be in six months, let alone a year, let alone any point in the distant future. We are, once again, creating a high level event for a sport that simply doesn’t demand that sort of thing.

When the NFL was first formed–hell, even before that: when people first started playing football in the U.S., they didn’t start having a championship right away–at least not the sort of championship we think of now with the SuperBowl. Sure, there were championships–but they were local, small, and pretty much just like any other tournament.

whbpc2014The point I’m making is that there wasn’t much of a point to having a huge event for the sport because the sport simply wasn’t there. There were developing rules, developing equipment, and developing culture around the event of American football itself. People realized that having a huge championship was more pain than what it was worth, so why put the pressure on?

the World Hardcourt Bike Polo Championship is something that brings a lot of great players together. That’s about it. Sure there is the glory of being the best in the world, but that’s about all you get. There aren’t legions of fans paying ticket prices that benefit the NAH or the hosting club or the teams that win. There aren’t huge sponsors throwing money to Mr. Do to get on the stream. There aren’t TV stations that are reserving time and fighting for filming rights.

“But Crusher, there never will be unless we keep having big tournaments.”

Bullshit.

WHBPC2013 (116)Think of it this way: if hosting clubs are still struggling to find good refs, good locations, sponsors, spectators, and everything else that goes with running a sports tournament, all that people will see when they look at bike polo will be a group of people playing a sport they only kinda heard of. They won’t see a really clean, well organized, or well attended event.

There are probably a hundred things that could change with the idea of a world bike polo tourney, but I’ll suggest just a few that have been springing up in my brain the past few weeks:

1. Make the tourney every other year, or ever three years: this allows organizers to work a bit longer in getting people in the seats, sponsors on the walls, and interest from local news. It also gives potential refs 2-3 years to practice just for Worlds. That’s a real, honest-to-Dog length of time to really develop the skills to be a world-class ref.

2. Don’t put so much pressure on it: Go ahead, have your whole-world bike polo tourney–but don’t make it such a big deal. We aren’t there yet, there isn’t a demand (even really a huge demand from players). Why not stop clawing at the hope that if we build it up as a worldwide event it will be.

3. Wait for critical mass before the next WHPBC. Wait for there to be a need before we create a solution. I think this can be said for a lot of parts of bike polo, but it applies here, too: we’re running so hard to make something exist where there is simply no need for it to.

And I get it: polo for lots of folks isn’t about making it any bigger and it isn’t about getting Nike to give a damn or see your face on the nightly news. But if that’s the case, why are players doing everything that professional sports players do in regards to travelling thousands of miles to play, essentially, just another bike polo tournament? What’s the overall value other than the pride of playing at Worlds–and is that worth thousands of dollars to do?

We’re trying to create a professional sport that isn’t even a sustainable one yet. Let’s just put the brakes on for a minute and think about what’d be nice to do, what we need to do in the future, and what we must do right now.

NAH, Rules, Tournaments

If You Can’t Ref, Don’t.

September 11, 2014

There’s plenty to be proud of about Worlds this year. Great courts, lots of people got to play, and the majority of us got to watch it from the comfort of our own bike polo aviary homes.

But there was one instance I saw where there wasn’t anything to enjoy, and that was when Ratking had a match go south on them because a ref wasn’t able to make accurate calls.

At a World Championship.

In 2014.

It’s something that’s bothered me from then until now, so let’s talk it out.

The thing about reffing is, frankly, I’m no good at it. I can see infractions and I kinda sometimes know what the call is, but none of that happens instantaneously. It happens about five or so seconds late, and that makes me, you guessed it, a crummy ref.

The thing that makes me so comfortable with being a bad ref is that I know I’m a bad ref, and so I avoid the position as much as possible. When Joe asked me to ref at North Americans (half-jokingly, I’m sure), I gave him a clear, definitive no. Not because I don’t believe in giving back to the sport and not because I’m lazy (I did goal judge a whole lot, point in fact), but because I knew I wasn’t up to the challenge, and that I wouldn’t be doing the best for the players.

And having that knowledge, friends is [a G.I. Joe joke].

But it’s strange to me that I, lowly as I am in the sport, would recognize that whereas at Worlds, that thought didn’t apparently cross the minds of the organizers. Having someone holding the whistle doesn’t make a ref. Hell, passing the NAH ref test doesn’t make a ref.  It’s something else–it’s knowledge and application. I understand the drive to help, and even the pressure to do so, but the fact is that unless you’re very confident and very able to apply the rules and regulations in a match, you shouldn’t be using a real, qualifying/NAH tourney to learn how to.

And I realize that this goes against some of the other things I’ve said on this blog (one of which I’ll include below just to show you how hypocritical I am).

Now I’m not exactly blaming the organizers of Worlds, and I’m certainly not blaming the poor guy who Ratking made walk off in search of a more qualified ref. I’m blaming the oddity of polo where we demand good refs but refuse to make them or try to create strong avenues to practice. Something I liked about the Eastside Thaw last year (that worked with some success, though players still yelled at refs like it ever makes a difference), was introduce the idea that it was a place for players to learn to ref and for players to learn to play. I think there should be a push for that–a live clinic of reffing. Doing it on the web is a great first step, but like many things, sometimes doing it for realsies is the best way of learning.

I’m going to say: if you don’t know how to ref, don’t ref. Don’t put yourself in a position to make yourself feel bad nor to destroy a team’s chances to advance because of your mistake. Furthermore, you should determine early on if you’re any good at reffing to begin with (which is something different than knowing the rules), and if you’re not good, don’t force yourself into it.

I have no doubt at all that the next round of great refs is out there–but we shouldn’t be so desperate to put a whistle in someone’s hand as to take anyone at all. It reduces the trust in refs overall and makes a mockery of enforcing rules.

 

Tournaments

Timaru’s 2015 WHBPC Bid

September 10, 2014
timaru NZ whbpc bid

The Australasian Hardcourt Bike Polo Association is formally submitting a bid to host the World Hardcourt Bike Polo Championships in 2015 in Timaru, NZ. This is a joint submission from the entire region of New Zealand and Australia to host the event. Approval of this bid a full year in advance allows for proper planning and would allow participants access to cheaper airfares.

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